Take The DICE Studio Tour

Posted on February 22, 2011

In addition to sitting down for an interview about building Battlefield 3, general manger Karl-Magnus Troedsson led us on a quick tour of the beautiful DICE studio situated in the heart of Stockholm, Sweden.  Check out the video to get a better idea of where the Battlefield series is crafted.

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Head to the Battlefield 3 hub to check out more information about DICE’s latest shooter.


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Video Games Intersect Social Networks at D.I.C.E.

Posted on February 14, 2011

Some of the brightest minds in the video game world discussed the industry’s rapidly growing relationship with social media at this year’s D.I.C.E. Summit. Mark Cerny, whose career stretches back to designing arcade games in the 80’s, broached the subject in broad terms during his talk titled “The End of Death, the Crash of 1982 and Other Topics.”

In it, he discussed the challenge of unlearning habits and moving forward in changing times. As an example he cited how even today designers struggle to break free from the artificial requirement that a player die many, many times which is a holdover from arcade games needing to keep players paying the next quarter. He surmised that in similar fashion it will take at least 10, and as ma…

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DICE Interview: Building Battlefield 3

Posted on February 12, 2011

On our recent trip to Sweden, we sat down and talked to DICE’s General Manager Karl-Magnus Troedsson about the company’s approach to creating the long-awaited sequel to Battlefield 2.  A lot has happened over the last six years, and in the first video Karl-Magnus explains what the company has been up to and why 2011 is the perfect time to release Battlefield 3.

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Check out the video below to see Karl-Magnus Troedsson share his insight on what makes DICE such a unique developer within the gaming industry.

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Mass Effect 2 hits DICE jackpot

Posted on February 12, 2011

DICE 2011: Red Dead Redemption, Enslaved, and God of War III upset at Academy of Interactive Arts and Sciences’ annual trophy fest.

LAS VEGAS–Thursday has by far been the most eventful day for the Academy of Interactive Arts and Science’s 2011 DICE Summit, and it has already seen panels from the likes of Jade Raymond, Richard Garriott, and the BioWare doctors Ray Muzyka and Greg Zeschuk, as well as a number of other high-profile industry notables. However, the crowning jewel of the day is still to come, with the 14th Annual Interactive Achievement Awards slated to begin at 7:30 p.m. PT tonight.

The leading contender this year is Rockstar Games’ Red Dead Redemption, which has already taken home a number industry awards, including GameSpot’s Game of the Year. However, Rockstar’s Western has stiff competition in all of the nine categories it is competing in, from the likes of Namco Bandai’s Enslaved and Sony’s God of War III, each of which has earned six nominations.

Both Red Dead Redemption and God of War III, but not Enslaved, are up for the AIAS’ coveted Game of the Year award. Other nominees for the top honor include Treyarch’s best-selling Call of Duty: Black Ops, BioWare’s sci-fi role-playing game Mass Effect 2, and the breakout iPad gaming hit Angry Birds HD.

A number of industry luminaries are also slated to receive accolades tonight. Muzyka and Zeschuk will both be inducted into the AIAS’ Hall of Fame, while former EA star and current venture capitalist Bing Gordon will be bestowed with a Lifetime Achievement award. Bill Budge will walk away from the evening with the organization’s second annual Pioneer Award.

Industry-staple funnyman Jay Mohr is on hand to host tonight’s event, which will be going down at the Red Rock Resort and Casino in Las Vegas. Stay tuned for GameSpot’s liveblog to receive updates on award winners as they happen. And who knows, perhaps the evening will end with a game reveal, as it (sort of) did last year.

[7:42] The 14th Annual Interactive Achievement Awards is about to begin, as the assembled industry collective dabs their mouths after a meal furnished by the AIAS.

[7:42] Designers have turned out in the nines, largely, as business casual meets jeans, stylish shirts, and gym shoes.

[7:43] Of note: OPEN BAR! Here’s hoping a certain loose-lipped analyst has properly libated.

[7:44] Despite being advised by the PA system for attendees to take their seats, it does not appear as if anyone is doing so.

[7:44] The work of the networker never ceases, it would appear.

[7:45] OK, here we go. The lights go down, and the noise joins it.

[7:45] On screen, a video scrolls, offering slogans that are reminiscent of The World’s Most Interesting Man.

[7:45] But, of course, it’s not. It’s Duke Nukem.

[7:45] Borderlands’ Claptrap appears to be directing the “commercial.”

[7:46] And he proceeds to berate Duke over his long absence.

[7:47] The video has Claptrap telling Duke that he needs to be more like Game of the Year nominee Red Dead Redemption.

[7:48] Duke then pretends to be in various other GOTY nominees, ranging from God of War III to Halo: Reach.

[7:49] The video ends with Duke blowing Claptrap to pieces with a rocket launcher…and we’re on to the actual show!

[7:49] Jay Mohr takes the stage. This is his sixth year hosting.

[7:50] Mohr bemoans his failed career, saying he should be more like Charlie Sheen.

[7:51] He’s apparently screentested for the Angry Birds TV show, saying he is trying to get the role of the “white one that constantly takes a dump on things.”

[7:52] “I will never be as good at any of the jobs I’ve had as you all are at yours,” he says.

[7:52] The crowd gives itself a hand.

[7:52] Richard Garriott apparently just got engaged?

[7:52] That appears to be an actual thing…

[7:53] The sideburns and neck beards appear to be particularly well groomed tonight, he says.

[7:53] BlizzCon makes this event look like the Kennedy Center Honors, he says.

[7:53] Yes, Blizzard’s top brass is in attendence.

[7:57] Mohr is back to lauding the audience and the award ceremony. This ceremony, he says, is devoted to nothing but games.

[7:57] That’s apparently a good thing, because when the awards come from luminaries within the industry, that just makes sense and feels good.

[7:58] Some great titles came out this year, he says, name checking Super Meat Boy and DeathSpank.

[7:59] He says he didn’t play either, but those are some “real ballsy titles.”

[7:59] If you see The King’s Speech and Super Meat Boy on a retail shelf, the choice is clear.

[8:01] Mohr apparently has an issue with Obsidian’s decision to cast Matthew Perry in Fallout New Vegas.

[8:02] He then proposes a number of better alternatives, including Harvey Keitel and Tracy Morgan.

[8:02] These are, of course, accompanied by fairly spot on impersonations.

[8:04] Mohr’s about to make fun of Ubisoft now, talking up Michael Jackson: The Experience.

[8:06] Call of Duty: Black Ops sales are next up for ridicule.

[8:06] Activision, you’re like James Cameron. You make one record-breaking hit after another, and absolutely no one wants to work with you.

[8:11] EA Sports is next up for ridicule…Tiger Woods to be exact.

[8:12] He says EA gave them an ultimatium: get better or lose your game.

[8:12] But come on, he says, who would you replace him with? A drunken John Daley?

[8:14] Online gaming is his next topic: DC Universe he says is his current fascination, and it gives a whole new generation of kids to pass on being Aquaman.

[8:14] Poor Aquaman, he didn’t ask to be drawn.

[8:16] Every console made some major technological advances last year, he says.

[8:17] PS3 offered 3D, Xbox 360 has Kinect, and the geniuses over at Nintendo made…a red Wii.

[8:17] All we ask for is effort, Nintendo, he says.

[8:17] Alright! It looks like Mohr’s comedy routine is over, and it’s time to start handing out awards.

[8:18] Ted Price and Morgan Webb will be handing out the first award, which will go to outstanding achievement in visual art.

[8:19] The nominees are: COD: Black Ops, Enslaved: Odyssey to the West, God of War III, Red Dead Redemption, Tom Clancy’s Splinter Cell Conviction.

[8:19] And the winner is…God of War III

[8:19] Bruno Velazquez served as art director on that one.

[8:24] For the Art Direction award, we have Alan Wake, Enslaved, God of WAr III, Kirby’s Epic Yarn, Red Dead Redemption.

[8:24] And the winner is… Red Dead, directed by Daren Bader.

[8:24] Visual Engineering award nominees: Call of Duty Black Ops, God of War III, Heavy Rain, Medal of Honor, Metro 2033.

[8:24] The winner is… Heavy Rain, directed by Damien Castllitort.

[8:25] Gameplay Engineering nominees: Dance Central, Kirby’s Epic Yarn, Red Dead Redemption, Super Mario Galaxy 2, Super Scribblenauts.

[8:25] And the winner is: Red Dead Redemption, Christian Cantamessa directed that one.

[8:25] Character Performance nominees are next.

[8:26] Nominees are Monkey from Enslaved, Kratos from God of War, Male Shephard in Mass Effect 2, John Marston in Red Dead Redemption, Tychus Findlay in Starcraft II.

[8:26] The winner is, John Marston in Red Dead Redemption.

[8:26] After the battery of awards, Mohr is back for more jokes.

[8:27] People are apparently happy about the show, according to folks on Twitter. “Usually, these tell me what an a****** I am,” Mohr says.

[8:27] To present the award for Family Game of the Year, they picked–aptly?–Randy Pitchford, CEO of Duke Nukem Forever publisher Gearbox.

[8:28] Those who know me best know I’m a huge family man, Pitchford says. The only thing he enjoys more are all his attempts to create them.

[8:28] Guess Mohr isn’t the only comedian here tonight.

[8:28] Family Game of the Year nominees are: Dance Central, Kirby’s Epic Yarn, Lego Harry Potter: Years 1-4, Rock Band 3, and Singstar Dance.

[8:28] And the award goes to…Dance Central, from Harmonix.

[8:29] Alex Rigopulos takes the stage, saying that the team was dying to make this game, because people are seldom happier than when they’re dancing.

[8:29] Mohr retakes the stage, and introduces the man who will present the Racing Game of the Year, introducing Don Mattrick.

[8:29] Racing Game of the Year nominees: Gran Turismo 5, ModNation Racers, Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit, and Split/Second.

[8:29] And the winner is…Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit, developed by Burnout studio Criterion.

[8:30] It’s now time to present Bill Budge his Pioneer Award, the second that the AIAS has handed out. Don Daglow presents.

[8:31] It’s been 30 years since Bill Budge burst on the screen, he says. It was the time of Atari and consoles, but it was also the world of Apple II computers.

[8:32] Into that era came Bill Budge, where programmers hand-placed pixels. When Bill came with Raster Blaster, he changed everything. He made it easier for developers first, and then with Pinball Construction Set, he gave that power to the players.

[8:32] After the crash of the console market, people still had Budge’s games on PCs, which were being bought by parents for their kids’ homework.

[8:32] He inspired a generation of designers to not give up.

[8:33] This quite, humble guy built the foundation that we all get to enjoy today, he says.

[8:36] A highlight reel of Budge’s career unspools, with industry luminaries that include Will Wright extolling the man’s contributions.

[8:36] Budge takes the stage to a standing ovation from the room.

[8:37] “I love working at Google, but it’s funny, because all they talk about is the games they want to program.”

[8:38] He says it’s amazing to look at his old games and how primitive they look compared to what people are making now.

[8:39] Budge exits, Mohr enters.

[8:39] The president of the Academy of Interactive Arts and Sciences, Martin Rae, takes the stage.

[8:40] He is here to detail the voting process that went into these awards.

[8:40] The voting process defines us, he says. The process is driven by game creators, and winners are honored by their peers, he says.

[8:40] The panel votes to come up with a list of finalists, and then that list is sent to some 20,000 members to hone down.

[8:40] And Mohr is back.

[8:41] The man behind the Ratchet and Clank series is presenting now, Brian Algier.

[8:42] Algier is here to present the award for outstanding achievement in story.

[8:42] The nominees: Alan Wake, Enslaved: Odyssey to the West, Heavy Rain, Mass Effect 2, and Metro 2033.

[8:42] And the winner is…Mass Effect 2, written by Mac Walters and Drew Karpyshyn.

[8:43] BioWare founders Ray Muzyka and Greg Zeschuk accept the award. They’ll be back later to receive tonight’s Hall of Fame induction.

[8:46] Morgan Webb and Blair Herter are here to present the next award.

[8:47] Role-playing and MMOG of the Year nominees are next.

[8:47] Dragon Quest IX, Fable III, Fallout: New Vegas, Mass Effect 2, and World of Warcraft: Cataclysm are the nominees

[8:48] Mass Effect 2 is the winner.

[8:48] Ray and Greg are back to accept the award.

[8:49] Mohr again retakes the stage to introduce the next presenter.

[8:49] Gran Turismo 5 Kazunori Yamauchi takes the stage to present the next award.

[8:50] He is joined by Mark Cerny.

[8:50] Innovation is the award that’s up, by the way.

[8:51] These nominees are: Angry Birds HD, Dance Central, Heavy Rain, Limbo, and Red Dead Redemption.

[8:51] And the winner is…Heavy Rain.

[8:53] Mohr retakes the stage to introduce the next group of presenters, Mike Morhaime and Mike Capps, heads of Blizzard Entertainment and Epic Games, respectively.

[8:54] Yesterday, was the 20 year anniversary of Blizzard, Mohr says.

[8:54] The Mikes take the stage to induct the Doctors, Ray Muzyka and Greg Zeschuk, into the AIAS Hall of Fame.

[8:55] Their industry careers are inseperable, Capps says.

[8:55] He goes on to say that he greatly admirers the way the two have nurtured BioWare as a studio, and feels that at this rate, everyone will be working for them one day.

[8:56] Morhaime then introduces a sizzle reel of the Doctors’ work.

[8:57] The titles include include Mass Effect, Knights of the Old Republic, Baldur’s Gate, and more.

[8:58] Their first game was Shattered Steel, and their second game was Baldur’s Gate.

[9:00] The video ends, and EA CEO John Riccitiello takes the stage to actually present the award.

[9:00] Riccitiello says Ray and Greg have a better grasp on quality than anyone he’s ever met.

[9:01] He welcomes them to the stage, and they receive a standing ovation, accompanied by blinding strobe lights.

[9:03] The two begin their thanks, giving shout outs to Riccitiello, Mike Morhaime, and “the Academy,” and Muzyka says that they feel compelled to continue to live up to the award.

[9:04] He thanks Interplay, which gave them their start, and then any number of other studios that BioWare has worked with, ranging from Sega to EA.

[9:05] Zeschuk then gives a shout out to everyone at BioWare.

[9:05] Zeschuk continues to thank people, and then echoes comments made by Muzyka, saying that they don’t feel like they’re done yet.

[9:06] Thank you for the award, we’re going to try our best to earn this, and the two depart.

[9:07] Mohr is back to present the award for outstanding achievement in music and sound.

[9:07] PopCap senior producer Matthew Lee Johnston takes the stage.

[9:09] The nominees for outstanding achievement in original music: Assassin’s Creed: Brotherhood, Fable III, Heavy Rain, Starcraft II, and World of Warcraft: Cataclysm.

[9:09] And the winner is…Heavy Rain.

[9:10] The nominees for outstanding achievement in soundtrack are: Dance Central, DJ Hero 2, Gran Turismo 5, Rock Band 3.

[9:10] And the winner is…Rock Band 3, from Harmonix and MTV Games.

[9:11] Nominees for outstanding achievement in sound design are: Assassin’s Creed: Brotherhood, Battlefield: Bad Company 2, Limbo, Medal of Honor, and Red Dead Redemption.

[9:11] And the winner is: Limbo

[9:12] Mohr is now introducing Mark Lamia and Dave Anthony, from Treyarch.

[9:12] They are here to present adventure game of the year.

[9:13] Adventure Game of the Year nominees are: Alan Wake, Assassin’s Creed: Brotherhood, Enslaved: Odyssey to the West, and Heavy Rain, Limbo.

[9:14] And the winner is…Limbo.

[9:15] Nexon president Min Kim then takes the stage alongside Dr. David Gallo.

[9:15] They are the presenters for Oustanding Achievement in Online Gameplay, with nominees including:

[9:20] Assassin’s Creed: Brotherhood, Battlefield: Bad Company 2, Call of Duty: Black Ops, Halo: Reach, and Starcraft II.

[9:20] And the winner is… Starcraft II.

[9:20] Frank Pearce takes the stage to accept the award, thanking everyone at the studio and everyone on the Battle.net team.

[9:20] Mohr is then back to introduce Jade Raymond and Adam Sessler, who will present the award for the year’s best action game

[9:20] And the nominees are: Battlefield: Bad Company 2, Call of Duty: Black Ops, God of War III, Halo: Reach, and Red Dead Redemption.

[9:20] And the winner is…Red Dead Redemption.

[9:20] And…it would appear that no one here from Rockstar is present to accept the award.

[9:21] Zynga’s chief game designer Brian Reynolds is joined on stage by Kristin Adams of G4.

[9:22] They are here to present the award for Sports game of the year.

[9:22] Nominees are: FIFA Soccer 11, MLB 10: The Show, NBA 2K11, and NHL 11.

[9:22] And the winner is FIFA Soccer 11.

[9:23] Next up is fighting game of the year.

[9:23] Nominees are BlazBlue, EA Sports MMA, Super Street Fighter IV, and UFC 2010 Undisputed.

[9:23] And the winner is…Super Street Fighter IV.

[9:23] Strategy/Simulation game of the year is next.

[9:24] Dawn of War: Chaos Rising, Civilization V, Starcraft II, Supreme Commander 2, and Toy Soldiers.

[9:24] Starcraft II takes the award.

[9:25] Rich Kleiman, of Madden fame, next takes the stage.

[9:25] He is here to present the portable game of the year award.

[9:26] The nominees are: Dragon Quest IX, God of War: Ghost of Sparta, Infinity Blade, Professor Layton and the Unwound Future, and Valkyria Chronicles II.

[9:26] And the winner is…God of War: Ghost of Sparta.

[9:27] Richard Garriott takes the stage next to present two awards: casual game of the year and social networking game of the year.

[9:28] Casual game of the year nominees are: Angry Birds HD, Bejeweled 3, Kinect Sports, Pac-Man Championship Edition DX, Plants vs. Zombies.

[9:28] And the winner is…Angry Birds HD.

[9:30] And now Lord British is talking up social networking game of the year.

[9:31] The nominees are: CityVille, Family Feud, Frontierville, Nightclub City, and Ravenwood Fair.

[9:31] And the winner is…CityVille.

[9:32] Now t’s time for the Lifetime Achievement Award, and Microsoft’s Don Mattrick retakes the stage.

[9:32] Simply said, this award goes to Bing Gordon, Mattrick says. “But I’m off script right now.”

[9:32] Gordon brought smart and original thinking to a new industry 30 years ago, he says.

[9:33] Gordon captured the hearts and minds of gamers, and he is credited on more than 100 games as chief creative officer.

[9:40] A compilation video for Gordon is run, and it has the likes of Riche Hilleman, John Schappert, Frank Gibeau, John Doerr, and Paul Lee.

[9:40] The video also includes a spot from Robin Williams.

[9:42] The video ends, and Gordon takes the stage.

[9:42] Like tonight’s other honorees, Gordon receives a standing ovation.

[9:42] Gordon appears to have on a luxurious velvet shirt on.

[9:43] Gordon recites a poem that praises the industry.

[9:44] He appears to have committed it all to memory, though he has pages in front of him that he can check himself against.

[9:47] Gordon finally exits the stage after his long-winded acceptance poem.

[9:48] And we’re on to the penultimate award of the evening, which is being presented by Blizzard’s Rob Pardo.

[9:49] The nominees for outstanding achievement in game direction!

[9:49] Assassin’s Creed: Brotherhood, Enslaved: Odyssey to the West, Limbo, Mass Effect 2, and Red Dead Redemption.

[9:50] And the winner is…Red Dead Redemption, which was directed by Christian Cantamessa.

[9:51] And Mohr is back for the LAST TROPHY! Who’s excited?

[9:52] The Game of the Year award will be presented by Evan Wells and Christophe Balestra of Naughty Dog.

[9:54] Angry Birds HD, Call of Duty: Black Ops, God of War III, Mass Effect 2, and Red Dead Redemption.

[9:54] And the IAA Game of the Year Award goes to…Mass Effect 2!

[9:55] The crowd sounds shocked as Mass Effect 2’s name is read.

[9:55] Muzyka and Zeschuk retake the stage, with Ray saying simply, “Holy Crap!”

[9:55] What an amazing award to receive, Muzyka says, calling it a celebration of excellence.

[9:55] It’s a tremendous honor, he says.

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Mass Effect 2 hits DICE jackpot” was posted by Tom Magrino on Thu, 10 Feb 2011 19:40:22 -0800

DICE 2011: Looking Ahead And Not In People’s Ears, And Other Lessons From The BioWare Doctors

Posted on February 12, 2011

DICE 2011: Looking Ahead And Not In People's Ears, And Other Lessons From The BioWare Doctors

BioWare co-founders Dr. Ray Muzyka and Greg Zeschuk are responsible for some of the most successful and acclaimed franchises in gaming, and during their DICE 2011 presentation, the doctors discussed the business philosophies and core values that have led to BioWare’s success.

Not surprisingly, BioWare puts a heavy emphasis on long-term goal oriented thinking, and the doctors advise that while it might be attractive and easy to think about the now, it’s much more beneficial, creatively and from a business perspective, to instead focus on the “power of then.”

Risk is another key component to BioWare’s success. The doctors revealed that they bet BioWare on several occasions, the most notable of which was paying for Neverwinter Nights out of their own pockets.

“If it hadn’t worked,” Zeschuk admitted, “we probably would have crashed and burned, or very, very close to it. We actually bet the company when we joined Elevation and Electronic Arts. These are all calculated bets we made to try to get to where we thought we’d be more successful.”

Clearly, those risks paid off, and, as Zeschuk so eloquently put it, if not for the talented folks that call BioWare home, “We wouldn’t be here at all. We’d probably be…in a medical office looking in people’s ears and other things we don’t want to look inside.”


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14th Annual Interactive Achievement Awards—LIVE!

Posted on February 11, 2011

DICE 2011: Eyes turn toward Red Dead Redemption, Enslaved, and God of War III as industry luminaries convene on Las Vegas to honor the best and brightest of 2010.

LAS VEGAS–Thursday has by far been the most eventful day for the Academy of Interactive Arts and Science’s 2011 DICE Summit, and it has already seen panels from the likes of Jade Raymond, Richard Garriott, and the BioWare doctors Ray Muzyka and Greg Zeschuk, as well as a number of other high-profile industry notables. However, the crowning jewel of the day is still to come, with the 14th Annual Interactive Achievement Awards slated to begin at 7:30 p.m. PT tonight.

The leading contender this year is Rockstar Games’ Red Dead Redemption, which has already taken home a number industry awards, including GameSpot’s Game of the Year. However, Rockstar’s Western has stiff competition in all of the nine categories it is competing in, from the likes of Namco Bandai’s Enslaved and Sony’s God of War III, each of which has earned six nominations.

Both Red Dead Redemption and God of War III, but not Enslaved, are up for the AIAS’ coveted Game of the Year award. Other nominees for the top honor include Treyarch’s best-selling Call of Duty: Black Ops, BioWare’s sci-fi role-playing game Mass Effect 2, and the breakout iPad gaming hit Angry Birds HD.

A number of industry luminaries are also slated to receive accolades tonight. Muzyka and Zeschuk will both be inducted into the AIAS’ Hall of Fame, while former EA star and current venture capitalist Bing Gordon will be bestowed with a Lifetime Achievement award. Bill Budge will walk away from the evening with the organization’s second annual Pioneer Award.

Industry-staple funnyman Jay Mohr is on hand to host tonight’s event, which will be going down at the Red Rock Resort and Casino in Las Vegas. Stay tuned for GameSpot’s liveblog to receive updates on award winners as they happen. And who knows, perhaps the evening will end with a game reveal, as it (sort of) did last year.

Initializing…

Read and Post Comments | Get the full article at GameSpot


14th Annual Interactive Achievement Awards—LIVE!” was posted by Tom Magrino on Thu, 10 Feb 2011 19:40:22 -0800

Celebrating 10 Years Of D.I.C.E.

Posted on February 11, 2011

The Academy of Interactive Arts & Sciences (AIAS) is a not-for-profit organization that focuses on the advancement and recognition of our industry through a variety of programs and initiatives — one of which is its annual D.I.C.E. Summit. This year AIAS is celebrating the 10th year of D.I.C.E. with many special events planned this week in Las Vegas, all of which we are attending and covering right here on gameinformer.com. We caught up with AIAS president emeritus, Joseph Olin, who tells us about the summit’s humble beginnings, its purpose, and why the event matters to both you and the video game industry.

What’s the idea behind D.I.C.E.? Why create an event like this?
D.I.C.E. was started as a means to help fund the Academy. The people running the Academy 10 years ago, the members, were dissatisfied with what GDC had become, where it went from being a gathering of 1000 people to 5000 people. They felt there was no longer a place for the senior creative people in games to get together and just talk. GDC is just track after track after track and how do you negotiate among 5000 people? Going forward today, GDC is four times that and there’s more need and more desire to have an event that’s just for the creative community, which is the greatest thing that D.I.C.E. ever does, which is put very smart, talented, creative people in a room outside of their daily jobs and give them the opportunity to share ideas.

What was the first D.I.C.E. like?
Small. It was about 200 people. A lot of the people who spoke at D.I.C.E. that year were board members so it was sort of flying at the seat of their pants in terms of topics addressed. The sessions were geared more toward people sharing their philosophies, and I think that’s the one thread that runs across all iterations of D.I.C.E. It’s not really about ‘What I’ve done’ but ‘What I think is important.’ We’ve tried to make sure whoever we invite to speak at D.I.C.E. talks about their philosophy, not what they’ve done. Everyone in the room has done something great, so giving a postmortem on your latest million selling game, there’s 20 people in the room who could get up and do the same thing. There’s little value in that. So ask someone like a Brian Reynolds (Zynga), core game maker, ‘Why would you want to make Farmville? Where’s the game in Farmville?’ Obviously there’s 60 million people at the moment who think it’s great so it’s an important type of conversation to have and typically only happens at D.I.C.E.

How many people attending this year?
We sell out every year. It’s about 700 people.

D.I.C.E. stands for “Design, Innovate, Communicate, Entertain”, how does the event encompass that?
If you look at the speakers that we have, you’ll see some focus more on design philosophy, some will address that games are no longer games, just isolated segments of the world. We’re just another form of entertainment, and as such, we have to work harder to compete for mindshare with everyone else’s entertainment plan. Do I download something and watch it on my iPad? Do I play a game on my iPad? Or do I put a disk in my PS3 and get lost for a couple hours? Do I go to a movie? Do I just go hang out with friends at a coffee shop?

Games are now not just for that segment of people who want to play games. Everyone who plays games is playing and doing other things. The challenge this year, which I’ve asked speakers to address, is where games are in the real world. What do we have to do to challenge ourselves and continue to innovate, to get people to think that games as an interactive entertainment are time worth spending?

How is an event like this important to the standard consumer?
The consumer gets a dual benefit. Number one, thanks to our partnerships, certainly with G4, all of the sessions will be made available, so people will have the opportunity to hear conversations with their favorite game makers. That’s an interesting way to get behind the scenes, humanizing the process of game making, and how it’s just everyday people who are just a little bit bent and crazy and that’s why they choose to do this. From the industry perspective, the other thing that consumers get are the benefit of collaborations that happen over a drink sitting outside in the sun for a few seconds between people who are sharing ideas, and all of a sudden people who have never worked together decide they are going to work together on a project, and you’ll see the fruits of that relationship a year from now.

Where do you see D.I.C.E. and the Academy of Interactive Arts and Sciences in the next 10 years?
As technology becomes so seamless, everything that has a screen we expect that there will be a game on it, the challenge is to embrace all the different types of games that encompass all the different types of screens that we play on. Somebody was showing me the games on their Kindle. That’s the last thing in the world I’d imagine seeing a game on. I wonder if you can play Limbo on a Kindle because of the black and white screen. That can be a real challenge. The Academy needs to be the constant voice of creative talent and recognize that if it wasn’t for the talent in the room, or the talent of our members, no one would be able to play the games they’re spending hours of time on, even if it’s Angry Birds. I don’t know if anyone wants to spend 50 hours a week trying to level out on that game, but I get why it’s great for two minutes while you’re sitting at a bus stop killing time. The Academy will continue to look for platforms to take a look at these talented people that do what no one else can. The Academy will continue to look for ways to foster creative development in a way interesting to people that are fans of games.

What are some of the highlights at D.I.C.E. this week that our readers should look out for?
From a reader perspective, I think one of the things is the Interactive Achievement Awards. The most exciting thing is getting together with GameStop and our friends at Guildhall to create the Indie Game Challenge. We all want blockbusters because they’re great games, but they’re also financially lucrative, and we don’t want to forget that all the people who make blockbuster games today weren’t making blockbusters 15 years ago. The Indie Game Challenge is a great way to encourage your readers ‘Hey I can make a game!’ For $99 anyone can get an iOS kit, anybody can get a working version of Flash from Adobe, and all these are fair game to be able to make a game.

When we announce the winners Friday night it will be significant. A team who gets $100,000 as amateurs, it’s a nice cash prize. The biggest reward is the meetings we arrange for them with game makers interested in their work to give them feedback and pointers, maybe offer them jobs, or offer to buy their game. Ultimately it’s like Sundance.

Keep your browser locked on gameinformer.com for all the latest coverage out of D.I.C.E. Summit 2011. You can find the full D.I.C.E. schedule here.


Go to Source
(Game Informer)

DICE cancels two PC Battlefield projects in favor of Battlefield 3 (Battlefield 3)

Posted on February 06, 2011

DICE is clearly focusing all of its energy on Battlefield 3, which is what DICE general manager Karl Magnus Troedsson calls “the biggest launch in DICE’s history.”

Go to Source (GamesRadar)


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